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GaN

Rounding up Custom MMIC Best GaN RF Power Amplifier MMICs

Courtesy of Custom MMIC : Best GaN RF Power Amplifier MMICs

The power of GaN MMIC technology is strongest when applied to RF power amplifier MMICs. Here we quickly review some of our power amplifier MMIC successes with GaN.

The CMD262 is a 5 W GaN MMIC power amplifier die ready for Ka-band systems where high power and high linearity are a must. This MMIC amplifier delivers greater than 26 dB gain with a corresponding output 1 dB compression point of +37.5 dBm and a saturated output power of +38.5 dBm at 30% power added efficiency. It is a 50-ohm matched design eliminating the need for external DC blocks and RF port matching.

The CMD216 is a 5.6 W GaN MMIC power amplifier ideally suited for Ku band communications where high power and high linearity are once again crucial. This GaN power amplifier MMIC chip delivers greater than 16 dB of gain with a corresponding output 1 dB compression point of +37 dBm and a saturated output power of +38 dBm at 32% power added efficiency. The CMD216 amp is a 50-ohm matched design also offers full passivation.

The CMD184 is the best rf and microwave power amplifier MMIC chip in its category and is one of our best selling and most popular devices. It is a 4.5 W wideband GaN MMIC power amplifier die which operates from 0.5 to 20 GHz. It delivers greater than 13 dB of gain with a corresponding output 1 dB compression point of +34.5 dBm and a saturated output power of +36.5 dBm. The CMD184 power amplifier MMIC is a 50-ohm matched IC design, eliminating the need for RF port matching.

Custom MMIC CMD283C3

Announcing our Breakthrough GaAs and GaN MMICs

Courtesy of Custom MMIC : Announcing our Breakthrough GaAs and GaN MMICs

We are proud to announce our industry-first Ultra Low Noise Amplifier (ULNA) MMIC. The CMD283C3 provides an incredible 0.6 dB noise figure, outperforming all other LNA MMICs, and rivaling discrete component implementations. It operates over a frequency range of 2 GHz to 6 GHz (S & C-band) and has output IP3 of +26 dBm.

Four members of our new GaAs MMIC digital attenuator family are also being introduced. The CMD279 and CMD280 operate up to 30 GHz with 5-bit control. Attenuation range is up to 15.5 dB. Two, 2-bit attenuators, the DC-35 GHz CMD281 and DC-40 GHz CMD282, offer coarser control in 2 and 4 dB steps respectively. All four devices offer input IP3 of +42 dBm.

Our latest Distributed Amplifier, the DC-20 GHz CMD249P5, offers a positive gain slope with nominal 12 dB gain. The GaAs device features output Psat of +30 dBm and output IP3 of +38 dBm.

We also continue to enhance our line of unique low phase noise amplifiers (LPNAs). Responding to customer requests to assist in reducing unwanted phase noise and improve signal integrity and target acquisition in military radar systems, these LPNAs operate up to 40 GHz and offer low phase noise performance down to -165 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset. They serve as Local Oscillator (LO) drivers or receiver amplifiers in a variety of phased array radar, EW, military radio, instrumentation, and aerospace and space communication designs.

MMIC releases on our horizon include more ultra-low noise amplifiers and digital attenuators, as well as broadband distributed power amplifiers and GaN mixers.

RF Variable Attenuator

CMD282 RF Variable Attenuator by Custom MMIC

Courtesy of everything RF : RF Variable Attenuator by Custom MMIC

The CMD282 from Custom MMIC is a 2-bit Digital Attenuator that operates from DC to 40 GHz. Each bit of the attenuator is controlled by a single voltage of either 0 V or –5 V. The attenuator bit values are 4 dB and 8 dB, for a total attenuation of 12 dB. The CMD282 has a low insertion loss of 1.5 dB at 18 GHz and the attenuation accuracy is typically 0.1 dB step error. It is matched to 50 ohms and is available as a die that offers full passivation for increased reliability and moisture protection.

Product Specifications

Product Details

  • Part Number : CMD282
  • Manufacturer : Custom MMIC
  • Description : 12 dB, 2-Bit Digital Attenuator from DC to 40 GHz

General Parameters

  • Type : Digital
  • Frequency : DC to 40 GHz
  • Bits : 2 Bit
  • Channels : 1 Channel
  • Configuration : Solid State
  • Attenuation Range : 12 dB
  • Attenuation Accuracy : 0.2 to 1 dB
  • Power : 27 dBm
  • P1dB : 23 dBm
  • IIP3 : 42 dBm
  • Insertion Loss : 1.5 dB
  • Switching Time : 25 ns
  • Supply Voltage : -5 V
  • Control Voltage : -5 to 0 V
  • Interface : TTL/Serial/Parallel
  • Return Loss : 18 dB
  • Input Return Loss : 18 dB
  • Output Return Loss : 18 dB
  • Package Type : Die
  • Operating Temperature : -55 to 85 Degree C
  • Storage Temperature : -55 to 150 Degree C
  • RoHS : Yes
Breakthrough GaAs and GaN MMICs

Breakthrough GaAs and GaN MMICs Being Rolled out by Custom MMIC at IMS 2018

Courtesy of Custom MMIC : Breakthrough GaAs and GaN MMICs

We are proud to announce our industry-first Ultra Low Noise Amplifier (ULNA) MMIC. The CMD283C3 provides an incredible 0.6 dB noise figure, outperforming all other LNA MMICs, and rivaling discrete component implementations. It operates over a frequency range of 2 GHz to 6 GHz (S & C-band) and has output IP3 of +26 dBm.

Four members of our new GaAs MMIC digital attenuator family are also being introduced. The CMD279 and CMD280 operate up to 30 GHz with 5-bit control. Attenuation range is up to 15.5 dB. Two, 2-bit attenuators, the DC-35 GHz CMD281 and DC-40 GHz CMD282, offer coarser control in 2 and 4 dB steps respectively. All four devices offer input IP3 of +42 dBm.

Our latest Distributed Amplifier, the DC-20 GHz CMD249P5, offers a positive gain slope with nominal 12 dB gain. The GaAs device features output Psat of +30 dBm and output IP3 of +38 dBm.

We also continue to enhance our line of unique low phase noise amplifiers (LPNAs). Responding to customer requests to assist in reducing unwanted phase noise and improve signal integrity and target acquisition in military radar systems, these LPNAs operate up to 40 GHz and offer low phase noise performance down to -165 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset. They serve as Local Oscillator (LO) drivers or receiver amplifiers in a variety of phased array radar, EW, military radio, instrumentation, and aerospace and space communication designs.

MMIC releases on our horizon include more ultra-low noise amplifiers and digital attenuators, as well as broadband distributed power amplifiers and GaN mixers.

Stop by and learn more from at Booth #85

Benefits of Designing Wideband EW Systems

Tech Brief Describes the Benefits of Designing Wideband EW Systems with Positive Gain Slope MMIC Amplifiers

Courtesy of Custom MMIC

We are proud to announce our latest technical brief “Realizing the SwaP-C Benefits of Designing with Positive Gain Slope MMIC Amplifiers

Modern wideband microwave systems often require a flat overall gain response with respect to frequency. Achieving this performance can be difficult, however, since most wideband microwave components exhibit a negative gain slope as the frequency increases. In this technical brief, written by Custom MMIC’s Senior Applications Engineer, Chris Gregoire, an innovative solution to achieving a flat system response is thoroughly described.

Typically, this performance is achieved using equalizers to cancel the effects of negative gain slope components, however, a more efficient solution utilizes positive gain slope amplifier MMICs that eliminate the need for equalization. This approach reduces the size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) of the overall system directly through elimination of a series of now unnecessary passive components used in the equalization process. In addition, for systems that require multiple amplifier stages, the elimination of additional loss will reduce the total number of gain stages required. This will decrease a microwave system’s power consumption significantly.

To learn more, download the full tech brief at https://www.custommmic.com/positive-gain-slope/.

CMD255C3 RF Mixer by Custom MMIC

Courtesy of everything RF : CMD255C3 RF Mixer by Custom MMIC

The CMD255C3 from Custom MMIC is a general purpose double balanced mixer with a RF/LO frequency from 16 to 26 GHz. It has a low conversion loss of 6.5 dB, high LO to RF isolation of 40 dB, and a high input IP3 of 24 dBm across the bandwidth. The CMD255C3 can be used in both up/down converting systems and can be configured as an image reject mixer or single sideband modulator with external hybrids and power splitters. It is available in a 3 x 3 mm ceramic QFN surface mount package and can operate with an LO drive level as low as +15 dBm.

Product Details

    • Part Number : CMD255C3
    • Manufacturer : Custom MMIC
    • Description : 16 to 26 GHz (X, Ku, K Band) High IP3 Double Balanced Mixer

General Parameters

    • Type : Double Balanced Mixer
    • Application : Up Conversion, Down Conversion
    • RF Frequency : 16 to 26 GHz
    • LO Frequency : 16 to 26 GHz
    • IF Frequency : DC to 9 GHz
    • Conversion Loss : 6.5 dB
    • Noise Figure : 6.5 to 7 dB
    • LO Drive – Power : 25 dBm
    • P1dB : 14.5 dBm
    • IP3 : 24 dBm
    • LO/RF Isolation : 40 dB
    • LO/IF Isolation : 33 dB
    • Package Type : Surface Mount
    • Package : Ceramic QFN
    • Dimension : 3 x 3 mm
    • Operating Temperature : -40 to 85 Degree C
    • Storage Temperature : -55 to 150 Degree C
    • RoHS : Yes

New Broadband Non-reflective GaAs MMIC Switches Cover Frequency of DC-18 GHz

Courtesy of Custom MMIC

Custom MMIC continues to rapidly add to its extensive family of MMIC Switches; with two new GaAs MMIC switches, the non-reflective CMD235C4 and CMD236C4.

The CMD235C4 is a DC-18 GHz broadband MMIC SP5T switch offering broadband performance with an insertion loss of 2.5dB and high port-to-port isolation of 40dB at 10 GHz.

The CMD236C4 covers DC to 18 GHz and offers a low insertion loss of 2.5 dB and high isolation of 42 dB at 10 GHz. Ideally suited for high performance military and instrumentation applications, both switches provide a switching speed of approximately 60 ns and an input P1dB of 21 dBm.

These switches feature binary decoder circuitry that reduces the number of logic control lines. The control voltages for both switches are 0/-5V. Both MMICs are housed in a ROHS compliant 4×4 mm QFN surface mount package.

Visit https://www.custommmic.com/mmic-switches/ to learn more and download the complete datasheets

Advanced MMICs Aid in Reducing Size and Power in Phased Array Radar Systems

Advanced MMICs Aid in Reducing Size and Power in Phased Array Radar Systems

Courtesy of Custom MMIC  Read more here : Advanced MMICs Aid in Reducing Size and Power

Phased-array radar systems are important instruments in national electronic defense strategies. From the large, ship-based systems that scan for distantly launched missiles to the more compact arrays installed on fighter aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), electronic phased-array radars come in many sizes and forms, providing reliable signal detection and identification. These modern systems offer many advantages over earlier radar systems that relied on the physical movement of an antenna to steer a radar beam in search of a target. This earlier method is certainly proven and reliable, having been used in military platforms and commercial aviation for over 70 years, but it is limited in scan rate by the mechanical motion of the antenna. In contrast, a phased-array radar system uses many equally spaced antenna elements with phase shifters, with each element contributing a small amount of electromagnetic (EM) radiation to form a much larger beam. As the phase of each antenna element is shifted and aligned, the direction of the radar beam changes and, as the amplitude of each element is varied, the pattern of the far-field response is shaped into the desired response. Thus, the overall radar antenna beam can be steered without need of a mechanically rotated antenna. Beam forming, which can be now performed by means of analog or digital control, can take place at extremely high speeds, limited only by the switching speed of electronic components.

Historically, phased-array radar systems have been large in both cost and weight. With the explosive growth of UAVs and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) as key elements of the defense arsenal, the need for lighter phased-array radar systems in these weight-sensitive systems will continue to grow. In addition, the increased use of such radars for non-military applications, such as tornado detection by the US National Weather Service (Springfield, MO), is helping drive the demand for lower-cost systems. Fortunately, these growing demands placed on phased-array radar systems can be met with the help of modern RF/microwave integrated-circuit (IC) and monolithic-microwave-integrated-circuit (MMIC) technologies.

PHASED-ARRAY BENEFITS AND DRAWBACKS

The benefits of phased-array radar systems far outweigh their limitations, thus accounting for their growing use in many military electronic systems and platforms. Since beam steering in phased arrays can be performed at millisecond and faster speeds, the signal can jump from one target to the next very quickly, while frequency agility can be used to search quickly across a sector for targets. The coverage of a phased-array antenna beam is typically limited to a 120-deg. sector in azimuth and elevation. While this response is a known limitation of phased arrays, mechanically scanned radar systems also have limitations in the physical area available for the motion of the antenna. Important factors hindering the adoption of phased-array radar systems in many applications continue to be size, weight, power, and cost (SWAP-C). Efforts aimed at minimizing these four attributes represent a significant technological challenge that until recently has seemed a rather formidable hurdle. Phased array radars are, after all, quite complex and even growing in this regard as target identification becomes more difficult. How can SWAP-C reduction be accomplished?

A NEW PATH FORWARD

 (Figure 1)

A phased-array radar system (Fig. 1) is constructed from large numbers (often thousands) of transmit/receive (T/R) modules which enable the array to function as both a transmitter and a receiver. Initially designed with discrete hybrid components such as amplifiers, filter, mixers, phase shifters, and switches, these modules are now more commonly fabricated with high-frequency IC or MMIC technology. This switchover to IC technology has provided tremendous benefits in terms of SWAP-C reduction, but simply replacing components can only get a designer so far. Gaining additional SWaP-C benefits in any phased-array radar system also requires knowledge of how to best apply available IC and MMIC technologies to the system (Fig. 2). In fact, the key characteristics of size, weight, and power consumption in a phased-array radar system can usually be minimized by analyzing the design at the circuit, system, and technology levels.

Analysis at the technology level first involves a choice of semiconductor material. Modern commercial semiconductor foundries typically offer a number of different material technologies, but a choice among these is not always straightforward. Components in high-frequency T/R modules typically include high-power amplifiers (HPAs) for transmit purposes, low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) for receiving purposes, mixers and oscillators for signal translation (frequency upconversion and downconversion), and attenuators, filters, and switches for signal conditioning. Fabricating MMICs for all of these functions will likely require more than one semiconductor technology. For example, processes based on silicon-carbide (SiC) or gallium nitride (GaN) substrates will excel in higher-power portions of the system such as transmit functions, while processes using silicon-germanium (SiGe) or gallium-arsenide (GaAs) materials will exhibit lower noise for better performance in receiver functions.

Analysis at the system and circuit levels should be closely intertwined, as a system is only as good as the sum of its components. Unfortunately, the vast majority of IC and MMIC circuit suppliers do not give enough consideration to any specific system, opting instead to create generic components that can be used across wide reaching applications. Such an approach, while cost-effective in terms of IC and MMIC development, is not always optimal in reducing SWaP-C since these components cannot be easily customized for use in phased array systems.

Forward-thinking MMIC suppliers, such as Custom MMIC, have worked on approaches that combine technology, system, and circuit analysis to create components that resolve SWaP-C challenges in phased array systems. At the technology level, they have worked with nearly all of the world’s commercial III-V semiconductor foundries, and have intimate knowledge of some of the newest processes including optical pHEMT and high frequency GaN. At the system level, they have been engaged with numerous phased array designers and have heard first-hand how yesterday’s components are holding back development of next-generation low cost, low weight, high performance systems. At the circuit level, they have created an extensive intellectual property (IP) design library of components in both die and packaged form that are used as a starting point for advanced signal chain design and optimization.

As an example, one place where they have focused significant development is the transmit HPA, a common component required in almost every application. At microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies, the transmit amplifier is often fabricated from a depletion mode pHEMT process, a highly efficient and mature technology. However, depletion mode pHEMT is not without its drawbacks, most notably the need for negative gate voltage and a sequencing procedure to ensure the gate voltage is applied before the drain voltage, lest the FET device suffer irreparable harm. By their very nature, negative voltages and sequencing circuits for HPAs are expensive in terms of complexity, board space, and cost of the extra components. In phased arrays, especially ones with thousands of elements, such HPAs place enormous strain on the system as a whole and offer significant barriers to SWaP-C reduction. Therefore, as part of a Small Business Innovative Research grant (SBIR) from the U. S. Army, they attacked this problem for the transmit portion of an X-band phased array system. Rather than utilize depletion mode pHEMT, they turned to enhancement mode pHEMT for the HPA, a technology often relegated to other applications such as high-speed logic circuitry or switches. In enhancement mode, the pHEMT is normally off until a positive voltage is applied to the gate. Negative voltages are no longer required, nor are voltage sequencers, since either the control or the drain voltage can be applied first; the amplifier will not turn on until both are present. In the end, they were able to replace the existing depletion mode PA with an enhancement mode design that delivered 5 dB more gain, 1 dB more power, and 2 dB improved linearity, all while dissipating 25% less DC power. In terms of SWaP-C, the benefits of enhancement mode PAs are enormous, and offer a significant breakthrough for microwave system designers in general.

A second problem they considered was the receiver LNA in an X-band phased array system as part of a separate SBIR contract. Here, they also switched from a depletion mode to an enhancement mode process, thereby eliminating the negative voltages and sequencers of the existing solution. Their resulting design had 1 dB lower noise figure, 8 dB more gain, an eight-fold reduction in DC power, and half the unit cost of the existing depletion mode solution. However, they soon encountered an application that called for a pair of relatively well-matched LNAs, one for each of the two polarizations in the return signal. Starting with their enhancement mode LNA, they created a dual version on one MMIC die, thereby guaranteeing a matched pair. They also worked with their packaging vendor to develop a low cost rectangular QFN plastic package to best match the resulting die size. The end result was a “standard” product that was anything but ordinary, as it combined innovation at the circuit, system, and technological levels to deliver a component with significant impact on SWaP-C.

Moving forward, they are continuing to develop components for phased array radar systems and similarly challenged 5G wireless systems. Using other technologies such as high frequency GaN, and a combination of different semiconductor devices in multi-chip modules, they’re looking to help designers when digital control functions must be integrated with higher frequency functions.

“We’re learning more everyday about phased array radar and antenna system design challenges,“ says Custom MMIC CSO, Charles Trantanella. “Our product design approach has always been to listen and react, and we’re very pleased to have been able to not only deliver the high frequency performance specifications phased array system designers were looking for, but also the added-value of things like positive bias and positive gain slope characteristics that are proving invaluable in their quest to meet SWaP-C objectives.”

To learn more, download the Tech Brief: “Simplify Amplifier Biasing Using Positive Bias pHEMT MMICs

For application engineering assistance and additional technical resources, visit: https://www.custommmic.com/support/

GaN low noise amplifiers

New GaN Low Noise Amplifiers with High Input Power Handling

Courtesy of everything RF – Read full article here : New GaN Low Noise Amplifiers with High Input Power Handling

Custom MMIC has released three new unique GaN low noise amplifiers (LNAs) with easy to use evaluation boards.

The new GaN MMIC LNAs, CMD276C4CMD277C4and CMD278C4 deliver high linearity performance with output IP3 of +32 dBm while offering high input power handling capabilities of up to 5W. The high input power handling feature enables system designers to avoid limiters and other protection networks, while still achieving an extremely low noise figure over the operating bandwidth. The MMIC LNAs are housed in a leadless 4×4 mm QFN package. They are ideally suited for radar and electronic warfare (EW) applications where high performance and high input power survivability are required.

The CMD276C4 is a 2.6 to 4 GHz (S Band) LNA delivering greater than 14 dB of gain with a corresponding output 1 dB compression point of +25.5 dBm and a noise figure of 1.2 dB.

The CMD277C4 is a 5 to 7 GHz (C Band) LNA with 20 dB of gain, output 1 dB compression point of +26.5 dBm and a noise figure of 1.2 dB.

The CMD278C4 is a broadband 8-12 GHz (X Band) LNA with 15 dB of gain, output 1 dB compression point of +28 dBm and a noise figure of 1.8 dB.

Click here to see more the range of amplifiers from Custom MMIC.

The Phenomenon of High-Power Pulse Recovery in GaN LNAs- Part One

Read the full article on Custom MMIC website here: The Phenomenon of High-Power Pulse Recovery in GaN LNAs- Part One

INTRODUCTION

The Gallium Nitride (GaN) high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) is well known for its use in microwave and millimeter-wave power amplifiers due to its high breakdown voltage and ability to handle high RF power. Recently, GaN technology has also been used to create low noise amplifiers (LNAs) in the microwave region, as the noise properties of GaN are similar to other semiconductor materials, most notably Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) [1-2]. In many microwave systems, LNAs are subject to unwanted high input power levels such as jamming signals. One of the features of LNAs made from GaN is the ability to withstand these input power levels without the need for a limiter, due to the inherent robustness of the device [2]. Indeed, this is one reason GaN LNAs are supplanting their GaAs counterparts, since GaAs LNAs typically require a front-end limiter, which adds to the cost and degrades the performance of the LNA.

Despite the ability to operate without a limiter, GaN LNAs, however, are not completely immune to the effects of high input power. The problem occurs when both a high power jamming signal and the desired signal are input to the GaN LNA, and then the jamming signal is suddenly turned off. Under this scenario, the GaN amplifier does not recover immediately, as there is some residual distortion of the desired signal before normal operation returns. This phenomenon is known as pulse recovery time and is fast becoming an important parameter with regards to LNAs in general.

Past researchers have studied pulse recovery times in GaN LNAs, although this work has been limited in scope. One study presented recovery times of less than 30 ns in some amplifiers [3-4], but these measurements only utilized a coherent jammer, and the overall number of measurements was limited. A second investigation of pulse recovery time was performed on a GaAs LNA with a limiter [5]. The limiter not only effected the small signal performance, but it also increased the recovery time when high power was applied. Further research has been performed on the degradation of GaN HEMT noise performance after exhibiting DC and RF stress, which can cause forward gate current and damage the gate device [6]. However, this work did not explicitly address pulse recovery times in LNAs. Other papers have similarly analyzed the survivability of GaN amplifiers to high input power overdrive [7-10], but again this work offers little understanding of pulse recovery times. A summary of the relevant previous work is shown below in Table 1.

TABLE 1: Summary of Previous Work

Reference Jamming
Signal
Frequency Incident  Power of Jammer Duration of Jammer
[3] Coherent 8 GHz +39 dBm 250 ns – 3 us
[4] Coherent 3 GHz +20 to +33 dBm 250 ns – 3 us
[5] Non-
coherent
12 GHz (jammer)
7 GHz (signal)
+40 dBm 10 us
This work Non-
coherent
8.5 GHz (jammer)
7.5 GHz (signal)
+15 to +27 dBm 1, 2, 4, 6, 10, 100, 200, 400, 600 us

MEASUREMENT TEST SETUP

A functional description of the test setup is shown above in Figure 1. This setup uses two signal generators, where the first (labeled as #1) provides the out-of-band interfering signal at 8.5 GHz, and the second (#2) provides the desired continuous wave (CW) in-band signal at 7.5 GHz. The interfering RF signal from #1 is pulsed using a single pole single throw (SPST) switch controlled by a square wave with a low duty cycle. We chose to pulse the signal path, as opposed to the bias circuitry of the interferer amplifier, due to the fast rise/fall time of the SPST, which is on the order of 1.8 ns. Additionally, pulsing the power supply caused high levels of ringing to appear at the output. The interfering signal was amplified by an external power amplifier (PA) and then added to the desired signal with a passive power combiner. We utilized a circulator, terminated in a 20 dB pad and a high power 50 Ohm load, between the combiner and the device under test (DUT) in order to prevent any high power mismatch signal from reflecting back into the PA. The output of the DUT was then attenuated with an additional 20 dB pad, sent through a band pass filter with a pass band of 7.25 to 7.75 GHz, and then input into a digitizing oscilloscope. The filter attenuates the interfering signal to allow for an accurate measurement of the pulse recovery time. Finally, we utilized two different oscilloscopes for the measurement. A Tektronix digital serial analyzer oscilloscope was used to measure the recovery time for the shorter pulse widths, while a Hewlett Packard Digitizing Oscilloscope was used to measure the recovery time when longer pulses were used.

TABLE 2: Summary of Test Conditions – Short Pulses

Interferer Power (dBm) Pulse Width (us) Pulse Repetition (Hz) Interferer Energy (uJ)
17 6.00 500 0.30
15 10.00 500 0.32
23 2.00 500 0.40
20 4.00 500 0.40
17 10.00 500 0.50
27 1.00 500 0.50
20 6.00 500 0.60
26 2.00 500 0.80
23 4.00 500 0.80
20 10.00 500 1.00
27 2.00 500 1.00
23 6.00 500 1.20
26 4.00 500 1.59
23 10.00 500 2.00
27 4.00 500 2.00
26 6.00 500 2.39
27 6.00 500 3.01
26 10.00 500 3.98
27 10.00 500 5.01

The test procedure consisted of varying the pulse width and the input power of the interfering signal, while keeping the power of the desired signal constant at -10 dBm. A summary of the test conditions including pulse widths, repetition rates, and power levels of the interfering signal are presented in Table 2 (short pulses of 1 to 10 us), and Table 3 (long pulses of 100 to 600 us). In these tables we note the input power of the interfering signal was varied between 15 and 27 dBm, with the total energy delivered to the DUT being the important parameter of concern. All measurements with short pulses were performed on the Tektronix oscilloscope, whereas the long pulse measurements were performed on the Hewlett-Packard oscilloscope.

TABLE 3: Summary of Test Conditions – Long Pulses

Interferer Power (dBm) Pulse Width (us) Pulse Repetition (Hz) Interferer Energy (uJ)
15 100.00 100 3.16
17 100.00 100 5.01
15 200.00 100 6.32
20 100.00 100 10.00
17 200.00 100 10.02
15 400.00 100 12.65
15 600.00 100 18.97
23 100.00 100 19.95
20 200.00 100 20.00
17 400.00 100 20.05
17 100.00 100 30.07
26 600.00 100 39.81
23 200.00 100 39.91
20 400.00 100 40.00
27 100.00 100 50.12
20 600.00 100 60.00
26 200.00 100 79.62
23 400.00 100 79.81
27 200.00 100 100.24
23 600.00 100 119.72
26 400.00 100 159.24
27 400.00 100 200.47
26 600.00 100 238.86

To see the final test results download our new Tech Brief Understanding the Phenomenon of High-Power Pulse Recovery in GaN LNAs