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Coaxial Cable

Introduction to Coaxial Cable Losses

Courtesy of Pasternack : Coaxial Cable Losses

Coaxial cable transfers radio frequency power from one point to another and, in the ideal world, the same amount of power would transfer along the cable to the remote end of the coax cable. However, real world conditions include some power loss along the length of the cable. Loss, or attenuation, is one of the most important features to look for when deciding what type of coaxial cable to use in a design.  Loss is defined by decibels per unit length and at a given frequency. Thus, the longer the coaxial cable, the greater the loss. Loss is also frequency dependent, generally increasing with frequency, but the loss is not necessarily linearly dependent upon the frequency. Power loss occurs in a variety of ways:

Resistive loss

Resistive losses within the coaxial cable occur when the resistance of the conductors and the current flowing in the conductors results in heat being dissipated. Skin effect limits the area through which the current flows, which leads to increased resistive losses as the frequency rises. To reduce the level of resistive loss, the conductive area is increased resulting in larger low-loss cables. Also, multi-stranded conductors are often used.  Resistive losses generally increase as the square root of frequency.

Dielectric loss

Dielectric loss is signal energy dissipated as heat within the insulating dielectric of a cable, but is independent of the size of the coaxial cable. Dielectric losses increase linearly with frequency, and the resistive losses normally dominate at lower frequencies and. As resistive losses increase as the square root of frequency and dielectric losses increase linearly, the dielectric losses dominate at higher frequencies.

Radiated loss

Radiated loss in a coaxial cable is usually much less than resistive or dielectric losses, however poorly a constructed outer braid on some coaxial cables may yield a relatively high radiated loss. Radiated power, problematic in terms of interference, occurs when signal energy passing through the transmission line is radiated outside of the cable. Leakage from a cable carrying a feed from a high power transmitter may produce interference in sensitive receivers located close to the coax cable or a cable being used for receiving can pick up interference if it passes through an electrically noisy environment. To reduce radiated loss or interference, double or triple screened coaxial cables are designed to reduce the levels of leakage to very low levels.

Of these forms of loss, radiated loss is generally the less concerning as only a very small amount of power is generally radiated from the cable. Thus, most of the focus on reducing loss is placed onto the conductive and dielectric losses, except in certain applications.

Loss over Time

Loss or attenuation of coaxial cables tends to increases over time as a result of flexing and moisture in the cable. Although SOME coax cables are flexible, the level of loss or attenuation will increase if the RF cable is bent sharply or if there is a disruption to the braid or screen. Contamination of the braid by the plasticisers in the outer sheath or moisture penetration can affect both the braid where it causes corrosion and the dielectric where the moisture will tend to absorb power. Often, coax cables that use either bare copper braid or tinned copper braid experience more degradation than those with the more expensive silver plated braids. Although foam polyethylene provides a lower level of loss or attenuation when new, it absorbs moisture more readily than the solid dielectric types. Cables with solid dielectric polyethylene are more suited to environments where the level of loss needs to remain constant or where moisture may be encountered. Even though RF coaxial cables are enclosed in a plastic sheath, many of the plastics used allow some moisture to enter thus, for applications where moisture may be encountered, specialized cables should be used to avoid performance degradation.

Phase Locked Oscillators

Pasternack Launches Phase Locked Oscillators in Six Single Output Frequencies between 50 MHz to 6000 MHz

Courtesy of Pasternack : Phase Locked Oscillators in Six Single Output Frequencies between 50 MHz to 6000 MHz

New Phase Locked Oscillators Support External Frequency References and Deliver Exceptional Phase Noise Performance

IRVINE, Calif. – Pasternack, a leading provider of RF, microwave and millimeter wave products, has unveiled a new line of phase locked oscillators (PLO) that deliver accurate and stable output frequencies with low phase noise and spurious performance, making them ideal for use in radar and other exciter or frequency generation applications. Typical applications include phase locked loops, frequency synthesizers function generators and as a local oscillator source in receiver and transmitter stages.

Pasternack’s 20 new phase locked oscillator models are offered with popular fixed output frequencies of 50, 100, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000 and 6000 MHz. Typical performance for these PLOs includes excellent phase noise of -105 dBc/Hz at 10 KHz offset, a buffered output power level of +7 dBm and low second harmonic and spurious suppression levels of -25 dBc and -70 dBc respectively. They require an external frequency reference of either 10 MHz or 100 MHz and feature a TTL lock detect output to signal an out-of-lock condition.

These phase locked oscillator models are RoHS compliant and operate over the full temperature range of -30°C to +70°C. They require a single positive DC voltage supply are available in either SMA-connectorized or compact surface mount or packages. SMA-connectorized packages are nickel-plated with DC bias and signal pins and an integrated mounting baseplate. Surface mount packages feature gold over nickel mounting surfaces with downloadable Gerber file software for the mounting footprint. These PLOs are built to be rugged and withstand stringent MIL-STD-202 environmental test conditions for shock and vibration.

“Our new, comprehensive line of phase locked oscillators provides designers with a variety of popular fixed output frequencies that are stable and accurate. These 20 innovative designs are key components for many navigation, surveillance, communication or test and measurement systems,” said Tim Galla, Product Manager.

Pasternack’s phase locked oscillators are in stock and ready for immediate shipment with no minimum order quantity. For detailed information on these products, please visit https://www.pasternack.com/pages/rf-microwave-and-millimeter-wave-products/phase-locked-oscillators-(plo)-with-external-references.html. For inquiries, Pasternack can be contacted at +1-949-261-1920.

About Pasternack:

A leader in RF products since 1972, Pasternack is an ISO 9001:2008 certified manufacturer and supplier offering the industry’s largest selection of active and passive RF, microwave and millimeter wave products available for same-day shipping. Pasternack is an Infinite Electronics company.

Press Contact:

Peter McNeil
Pasternack
17792 Fitch
Irvine, CA 92614
(978) 682-6936 x1174

Quick Connect RF Loads with 10 Different Connector Options

Pasternack Introduces New Line of Quick Connect RF Loads with 10 Different Connector Options

Courtesy of Pasternack : Quick Connect RF Loads with 10 Different Connector Options

New Easy Connect Terminations Available with Frequency Ranges from DC to 40 GHz

IRVINE, Calif. – Pasternack, a leading provider of RF, microwave and millimeter wave products, has launched a new line of RF loads with ten different types of connectors for quick mating. Typical applications include DAS systems, base stations, antennas and test instrumentation.

Pasternack’s 24 new easy connect terminations are available with QMA, QN, 4.3-10, SMP, SMP-M and BMA connectors for quick, snap-on or push-on mating. These RF loads support operating frequency ranges from DC to 40 GHz. They deliver VSWR as low as 1.1:1 and input power up to 2W maximum. Some models are available with chains.

These quick connect RF loads improve flexibility of installation and eliminate the need for wrench or torque for thread coupling. The QMA model is made of tri-metal-plated brass, the SMP model is gold-plated brass, the SMP-M is made with gold-plated beryllium copper and the 4.3-10 model is nickel-plated brass. These terminations are ideal for industrial, telecommunication, defense and aerospace industries.

“Our new quick-connect and easy-install lines of RF loads and termination further expand our extensive product offerings of RF terminations. These new RF loads reduce installation time with enhanced electrical performance, compared to previous connectorized designs. All 24 models are available off-the-shelf with same day shipping,” said Steven Pong, Product Manager.

Pasternack’s quick connect RF loads are in stock and ready for immediate shipment with no minimum order quantity. For detailed information on these products, please visit https://www.pasternack.com/pages/rf-microwave-and-millimeter-wave-products/quick-connect-rf-loads.html. For inquiries, Pasternack can be contacted at +1-949-261-1920.

About Pasternack:

A leader in RF products since 1972, Pasternack is an ISO 9001:2008 certified manufacturer and supplier offering the industry’s largest selection of active and passive RF, microwave and millimeter wave products available for same-day shipping. Pasternack is an Infinite Electronics company.

Press Contact:

Peter McNeil
Pasternack
17792 Fitch
Irvine, CA 92614
(978) 682-6936 x1174

Bits on Baluns

Bits on Baluns – Part 2

Courtesy of Pasternack : Bits on Baluns – Part 2

Balun Performance Metrics

There are many different types of baluns and the type of balun used in microwave RF designs depends on the bandwidth required, the operating frequency, and the physical architecture of the design. Most baluns usually contain two or more insulated copper wires twisted together and wound around or inside a core, magnetic or non-magnetic. The following metrics are key in considering balun design, application, and performance.

Key specifications in determining the type of balun for a specific application include:

  • > Frequency coverage
  • Phase Balance
  • Amplitude Balance
  • Common Mode Rejection Ratio
  • Impedance Ratio/Turns Ratio
  • Insertion and Return Loss
  • Balanced Port Isolation
  • DC/Ground Isolation
  • Group Delay Flatness

Phase Balance

An important performance criterion based on how close the balanced outputs are to having equal power and 180° phase, or balance, measured by how closely the inverted output is to 180° out of phase with the non-inverted output. The phase angle deviation from 180° is phase unbalance.

Amplitude Balance

This metric is determined by construction and line matching and is usually specified in dB. Amplitude balance indicates the match between output power magnitude, and the difference of these two magnitudes in dB is called amplitude unbalance.  Generally, 0.1 dB improvement in amplitude balance will improve the common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) by the same amount as a 1° improvement in phase balance.

Common Mode Rejection Ratio (CMRR)

When two identical signals with identical phase are injected into the balanced ports of the balun, they will be either reflected or absorbed. CMRR, specified in dB, is the amount of attenuation this signal will experience from the balanced to unbalanced port. The vectorial addition of the two signals determines the CMRR which is dependent on the amplitude and phase balance of the balun.

Impedance Ratio/Turns Ratio:

The ratio of the unbalanced impedance to the balanced impedance usually stated as 1:n. This differential impedance is between the balanced signal lines and is twice the impedance between the signal lines and ground. Turn ratio in a flux coupled balun transformer, is the ratio of primary windings to secondary windings; the square of the turns ratio with a 1:2 turn ratio gives a 1:4 impedance ratio. Flux coupled transformers can be used to design high impedance ratio baluns.

Insertion and Return Loss

The lower the differential  insertion loss and higher the common mode return loss means more of the inserted signal power passes through the balun, and hence improved dynamic range, and less distortion of signals.  In an ideal balun without isolation, the common mode signal would be perfectly reflected, with a return loss of 0 dB, while the differential signal would pass through completely with a return loss of -∞.

Balanced Port Isolation

The insertion loss from one balanced port to the other as specified in dB. Most baluns do not offer high isolation because the even mode is reflected instead of being properly terminated with a resistive load. An exception is the 180° hybrid circuit where the even mode is output to a port that can be resistively terminated.

Pasternack Introduces New Line of 40 GHz Skew Matched Cable Pairs

Pasternack Introduces New Line of 40 GHz Skew Matched Cable Pairs for High-Speed Digital Testing

Courtesy of Pasternack : New Line of 40 GHz Skew Matched Cable Pairs

New Flexible Skew Matched Cables Provide 1 ps Delay Match and VSWR of 1.4:1

IRVINE, Calif. – Pasternack, a leading provider of RF, microwave and millimeter wave products, has launched a new line of skew matched cables for use in high-speed digital tests of 10 Gbps to 28 Gbps, including differential signals, bit-error-rate testing and eye diagrams.
Pasternack’s new line of skew matched cables is made-up of three new models that are extremely flexible and have 1 ps delay match. These cables deliver excellent VSWR of 1.4:1 and are 100% tested for skew match. They also include polarity indicators and restraint bands to keep themselves paired up.
These delay matched cables have a frequency range of DC to 40 GHz, covering two channels with 50 Ohms nominal impedance. They are made of micro porous PTFE cable dielectric and feature triple-shielded outer conductors, 2.92mm male connectors and finger-grip coupling nuts. They are ideal for networking, semiconductor test and supercomputing industries where skew match is important.
“These skew matched cable pairs perfectly complement our existing line of high-speed vertical and end launch connectors. They are extremely flexible while providing exceptional performance, plus we can ship them out right away,” said Dan Birch, Product Manager.
Pasternack’s new skew matched cable pairs are in stock and ready for immediate shipment with no minimum order quantity. For detailed information on these products, please visit https://www.pasternack.com/pages/rf-microwave-and-millimeter-wave-products/40-ghz-skew-matched-cable-pairs.html.
For inquiries, Pasternack can be contacted at +1-949-261-1920.
###
About Pasternack:
A leader in RF products since 1972, Pasternack is an ISO 9001:2008 certified manufacturer and supplier offering the industry’s largest selection of active and passive RF, microwave and millimeter wave products available for same-day shipping. Pasternack is an Infinite Electronics company.
Press Contact:
Peter McNeil
Pasternack
17792 Fitch
Irvine, CA 92614
(978) 682-6936 x1174
Bits on Baluns

Bits on Baluns

Courtesy of Pasternack : Bits on Baluns

Part 1: What is a balun, what does a balun do, and when is a balun needed?

What is a balun?

balun (mashup of balanced and unbalanced) is a three-port device, or a type of broadband RF transmission line transformer, with a matched input and differential output that is used to connect balanced transmission line circuits to unbalanced ones. A balun’s function is to make systems of different impedance or differential/single-ended compatible and are found in modern communication systems, including cell phone and data transmission networks.

What does a balun do?

Baluns have three basic functions:

1. Unbalanced to balanced conversion of current or voltage

2. Rejection of common mode currents with some configurations

3. Impedance transformation with some configurations (impedance ratios other than 1:1).

There are many types of baluns and include devices that transform impedances and to connect lines of differing impedance. Transformer baluns help with impedance matching, DC isolation, and in matching balanced ports to a single ended port. Common-mode chokes are also used as baluns and work by eliminating common mode signals. Baluns are used in push-pull amplifiers, wide-band antennas, balanced mixers, balanced frequency multipliers and modulators, phase shifters or whenever a circuit design requires signals on two lines that are equal in magnitude and 180 degrees out of phase.

When do you need a balun?

Baluns are most often used to interface an unbalanced signal to a balanced transmission line for long distance communications. On balanced transmission lines, differential signaling is more immune to noise and crosstalk, can use lower voltages, and is more cost effective than single-ended signaling on coaxial cables. Thus, baluns are used to interface local video, audio, and digital signals to long distance transmission lines. Baluns are present in:

– Radio and baseband video

– Radars, transmitters, satellites

– Telephone networks, wireless network modem/routers.

Balun Operation

Ideal S-parameters of a balun:

S12 = – S13 = S21 = – S31

S11 = -∞

The two outputs will be equal and opposite

– In frequency domain this means the outputs have a 180° phase shift.

– In time domain this means the voltage of one balanced output is the

– negative of the other balanced output.

One of the two conductors is clearly grounded.

For example, conductors having equal and opposite potential constitute a balanced line. Microstrip and coaxial cables use conductors of different dimensions and these are said to be unbalanced. Baluns are designed to solve problems caused by this imbalance in that a balun will transition between a balanced or differential transmission line where opposite currents both travel in transmission lines and an unbalanced, or single ended transmission line, where the return current travels through the ground.

In a coaxial cable, the currents on the inner conductor and the inside of the shield are equal and opposite because the fields from the two currents are confined to space in between. Skin effect allows a different current to flow on the outside of the shield which, if significant, causes the feedline to act like an antenna, radiating a field that is proportional to this current. Since it is physically symmetrical and the currents flowing through the conductors are equal and opposite, the radiation from the line is minimal. However, several factors may cause the currents in the two conductors to be imbalanced, that is, other than equal and opposite and, if this is the case, the balanced feed line will radiate like a coaxial cable that has current on the outside of the shield. This imbalance can cause pattern distortion, interference, and loss.

Key specifications in determining the type of balun for a specific application include:

  • Frequency coverage
  • Phase Balance
  • Amplitude Balance
  • Common Mode Rejection Ratio
  • Impedance Ratio/Turns Ratio
  • Insertion and Return Loss
  • Balanced Port Isolation
  • DC/Ground Isolation
  • Group Delay Flatness
Zero Bias Schottky Diode Detectors

More Details on Zero Bias Schottky Diode Detectors

Courtesy of Pasternack : More Details on Zero Bias Schottky Diode Detectors

The Schottky diode, named after German physicist Walter H. Schottky, is a semiconductor diode formed by the junction of a semiconductor with a metal. It has a low forward voltage drop and a very fast switching action.  Compared with the point contact diode used in similar applications, the zero bias Schottky diode has a wider dynamic range, increased thermal stability, and more accurate square law response. Zero bias Schottky diodes are used in precision testing equipment, transmitter, power, signal monitoring, missile guidance systems, and as microwave power detectors.

The zero bias Schottky diode detector is a type of RF power detector that does not need a bias voltage to operate and is widely used in RFID and other applications where no primary (DC) power is available in the standby or listen mode. Thus, power efficient or passive operation systems can use these detectors and forgo the large energy storage systems, DC bias, or low-power receiver circuitry. In this way, the zero bias Schottky diode detector is ideal for RFID tag applications where it can be combined with a simple antenna to form a receiver and, although it lacks the sensitivity of the superheterodyne receiver, it offers the advantages of reduced cost and zero power consumption. Although seemingly cost-effective, the performance of the zero bias Schottky diode detector is dependent upon its saturation current, frequency, temperature, DC bias, and ideality factor which, at both low and high temperature extremes, can lead to degradation in performance.

The zero bias Schottky diode detector has an established use in the detection of power at mm- and submm-wavelengths allowing for effective detection and mixing of electromagnetic radiation in the range through microwave to terahertz. These diode detectors can operate at ambient or cryogenic temperatures and have much faster response time when compared with room temperature detectors, such as Golay cells, pyroelectric detectors, or bolometers. When the diodes are optimized to have a low forward turn-on voltage, these detectors can achieve excellent frequency response and bandwidth, even with zero-bias.

Although the zero bias Schottky diode is less sensitive than alternative superconducting detectors, they generally do not require cooling and that makes them the devices of choice for applications where sensitivity is less of a priority. In the emerging field of terahertz technology, there is a need for cost-effective detectors for laboratory use as well as for serial compact and midsize instruments. Modern zero bias Schottky diode detectors are designed for use in power measurements, analyzing radar performance, leveling pulsed signal sources, AM noise measurements, microwave system monitoring, and in ultra-broadband and mm-Wave applications.

Commonly packaged in either inline coaxial barrel connectors, or waveguide-to-coaxial packages for millimeter-wave applications, zero bias Schottky diode detectors are typically compact and less expensive than other RF detector devices. Their simple construction also lends these devices to being relatively rugged and stable over a wide range of temperatures.

To learn more about Pasternack’s coaxial and waveguide Zero Bias Schottky Diode Detectors, click here

The Limits of Limiting Amplifiers

Courtesy of Pasternack : The Limits of Limiting Amplifiers

Is many applications, amplifiers are used to increase the strength of a signal, while minimizing the distortion and noise without sacrificing efficiency. However, with most receiver systems, and other applications, achieving the highest signal power isn’t the goal. As receivers circuits are typically highly sensitive to input power, and can be desensitized or damaged if exposed to sustained signal energy that exceeds some nominal amount depending on the specs of the receiver, capping the maximum amount of signal power over a frequency range can be a desired function. This is where limiting amplifiers are used.

Unlike many amplifiers that have a maximum output power limited by the input signal, gain, design feature, bias, and available power, limiting amplifiers are equipped with circuitry that provides a hard maximum power limit at the output. Hence, over a given frequency range, a limiting amplifiers will only output a set maximum signal energy, independent of the input. Like other amplifiers, the dynamic range, gain, and gain flatness are still priority parameters of limiting amplifiers.

As limiting amplifiers are often used in applications that require high signal fidelity, such as sensitive radar receivers, fiber optic transceivers in RF/optic converters, linearity, noise, and additive phase noise performance are also considerations. For high throughput data signals, like those used with fiber optic, microwave backhaul, and 5G millimeter-wave trails, maintaining signal quality while limiting input power to highly sensitive receiver circuits often jeopardized by interference, is key. Electronic Warfare (EW) applications are another common use of limiting amplifiers where sensitive radar receivers, active electronically steered array (AESA) transmit/receiver (TR) modules, and critical communication receivers are subject to high signal energies from nearby friendly transmitters and unfriendly jamming or interference.

Another key benefit of limiting amplifiers is to present low variation input power to a receiver circuit. This function can also be used to remove AM modulation from incoming signals and act as a comparator. These features make limiting amplifiers critical in the use of instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM) receivers, directional finding, digital radio frequency memory (DRFM), and a range of signal intelligence (SIGINT) uses.

Limiting amplifiers can be realized in a variety of ways. Some of the simplest output limiting amplifiers use clamping networks, which can be as simple as a two Schottky diode circuit and current limiting resistor, or as complex as a multi-transistor, diode, and resistor network for greater precision and faster recovery. Other types of limiting amplifiers operate using successive gain stages that “compress” from the input to the output of the amplifier. With any type of limiting amplifier, design challenges include wideband power limiting, as it is desirable for many applications for limiting amplifiers to cover multiple frequency octaves, especially with EW applications. Other design considerations must account for low variation power limiting, frequency equalization/stability, thermal management/compensation, harmonics, and dynamic range. Due to the often extreme operation temperatures and harsh environments that limiting amplifiers operate, they are commonly assembled in hermetically sealed packages with rugged connectors and wide operational temperature ranges.

To learn more about Pasternack’s line of Limiting Amplifiers, visit this link  https://www.pasternack.com/limiting-amplifiers-category.aspx

Exploring Types of RF Microwave Detectors

Courtesy of Pasternack : Exploring Types of RF Microwave Detectors

A radio frequency (RF) microwave detector, also known as RF power detector or RF responding detector, is a two-terminal device used to detect, and in some way, measure or convert an RF signal. As the receiving element, an RF detector is used in converting amplitude-modulated microwave signals to baseband (or video) signals in either a wireless or wired transmission. In RF circuits and systems, RF microwave detectors can detect the transmit power level of the RF signal in a particular frequency range. Another application of RF microwave detectors is to measure transmitter output power; as knowing the RF output power is crucial in not exceeding certain maximum transmitter power levels according to Federal Communications Commission regulations, and other international regulations.

The two main categories of detectors are peak and Root Mean Square (RMS). Peak detectors provide information on the peak power whereas RMS detectors provide information on the average power.

Peak detectors – also known as envelope detectors, capture the extreme of the voltage signal at its input. A positive peak detector captures the most positive point of the input signal and a negative peak detector captures the most negative point of the input signal. The output of the peak detector circuit tracks the input voltage until the extreme point is reached and holds that value as the input decreases. Ideally, the peak detector performs this function regardless of the speed of the input signal but is limited by the bandwidth of the input signal. A peak detector uses an amplifier, diode, and capacitor to capture and hold the peak value of the input RF signal. The signal charges the capacitor through the amplifier, and the diode prevents discharge of the capacitor. This is useful when the peak or maximum RF signal value is needed but it is not useful for determining average or any other sort of non-peak value.

RMS detectors – thermal detectors (power detectors) and square law detectors.

Thermal detectors like bolometers (e.g. thermistor or thermocoupler) convert the electrical power of the RF signal into thermal energy using a resistive component and then measure the temperature variation with respect to the ambient temperature. Advantages of this method are a very wide bandwidth and a good accuracy between measured power and real power. Examples include: Thermocoupler, a pair of dissimilar metal (Sb-Bi) wires joined at one end (sensing end) and terminated at the other end (reference end); Barretter: a short length of platinum or tungsten wire with a positive temperature coefficient of resistance; Crystal detector which uses the diode square-law to convert input microwave power to detector output voltage; and Schottky barrier or GaAs barrier diode which has high sensitivity noise equivalent power and the lowest detectable microwave signal power.

Square law detectors use the characteristics of semiconductors components (diodes or transistors) to convert a voltage into a signal proportional to the RF power which is typically low-pass filtered to realize the average operation. This kind of component is particularly useful for high frequency and low cost applications.

There are several other types of RF detectors, and detectors are also packaged in a variety of ways based on their application requirements. Inline coaxial assemblies and waveguide assemblies are the most common. There are log detectors, which convert a wide dynamic range signal into a logarithmic output, thus enabling an artificially enhanced dynamic range. There are also Zero Bias detectors, which apply diode detector devices that don’t require a bias voltage or current to operate, and are often used in low-power and passive applications (RFID). RF Threshold detectors convert an RF signal over a specific frequency range to a DC equivalent voltage. Lastly, there are Waveguide Detectors, which are simply an RF detector built into a waveguide housing.

Learn More about Pasternack’s RF detectors:

Waveguide Detectors:

https://www.pasternack.com/nsearch.aspx?Category=Waveguide%20Detectors&sort=y&view_type=grid

Log Detectors:

https://www.pasternack.com/50-ohm-sma-log-detector-positive-10-mhz-3000-mhz-pe8040-p.aspx

Threshold Detectors:

https://www.pasternack.com/nsearch.aspx?Category=Detectors&Rfacdt99design=Threshold&sort=y&view_type=grid

Zero Bias Detectors:

https://www.pasternack.com/nsearch.aspx?Category=Detectors&Rfacdt99design=Zero%20Bias&sort=y&view_type=grid

Pasternack Signs RF Design as Official Distributor for South Africa & Namibia

Courtesy of Pasternack

New Partnership Allows RF Design to Bring Pasternack Products to New Market

Pasternack Signs RF Design as Official Distributor for South Africa & Namibia

IRVINE, Calif. – Pasternack, a leading provider of RF, microwave and millimeter wave products, has signed RF Design of Cape Town as an authorized distributor of Pasternack products in South Africa and Namibia.

RF Design joins an extensive roster of international distributors that have partnered with Pasternack to increase the company’s sales channels and provide value-added services for customers in the RF market worldwide. As an official distributor of Pasternack products, RF Design will now be able to offer their customers access to the industry’s largest selection of RF, microwave and millimeter wave products available with same-day shipping from the United States.

“Expanding Pasternack’s presence into the South African market has long been viewed as a great opportunity for our business. Partnering with RF Design, the premier RF distribution company in South Africa, is an exciting development and will be mutually beneficial for our businesses,” explains Norm Brodeur, Director of Global Distribution at Infinite Electronics. “By enlisting this top-notch supplier of RF and microwave components, we will effectively be able to extend our product reach, technical support and customer service channels, and have a visible presence in South Africa and Namibia.”

For more information about Pasternack, please visit www.pasternack.com. For inquiries, Pasternack can be contacted at +1-949-261-1920.

For more information about RF Design, please visit www.rfdesign.co.za. For inquiries, RF Design can be contacted at +27 21 555 8400.

About Pasternack:

A leader in RF products since 1972, Pasternack is an ISO 9001:2008 certified manufacturer and supplier offering the industry’s largest selection of active and passive RF, microwave and millimeter wave products available for same-day shipping. Pasternack is an Infinite Electronics company.

About RF Design:

RF Design was established in 1988 as a supplier of RF/microwave components in Cape Town, South Africa. They have grown to represent a balanced portfolio of the world’s premier wireless data communications, RF/microwave component and sub-systems manufacturing companies with branches in all the major commercial centers of Gauteng, Cape Town and Durban. RF Design focuses on customer-driven solutions, with the highest priority on value added technical support.

Press Contact:

Peter McNeil
Pasternack
17792 Fitch
Irvine, CA 92614
(978) 682-6936 x1174